the Philippine Performance Archive Blog

Feb 8, 2018

Komedya, Moro-moro, and Linambay

Komedya, Moro-moro, and Linambay

Origin The linambay refers to the Cebuano-Visayan version of the Tagalog moro-moro or komedya— characterized by four major devices in staging: the batalya, the love angle, the trickster or fool or clown, rhyme

Dec 13, 2017

Cultural Performance in/and Performance Studies

Cultural Performance in/and Performance Studies

This essay is an excerpt from a forthcoming publication, Panata, Pagtitipon, Pagdiriwang: A Preliminary Contextualization of Cultural Performances in the Philippines by Sir Anril P. Tiatco. The discipline of performance studies is a

Nov 29, 2017

Creating a Philippine Puppet Theater Tradition

Creating a Philippine Puppet Theater Tradition

In 1977, Professor Amelia Lapeña-Bonifacio was invited by the University of the Philippines Department of Speech and Drama to present one of her plays. Originally a playwright for adult audiences, Professor Bonifacio decided

Oct 16, 2017

Vicente Barrantes on the Tagalog theatre

Vicente Barrantes on the Tagalog theatre

In 1887, the Spanish poet Vicente Barrantes published a slim volume titled El Teatro Tagalo, which presumably was about, as the title suggests, the Tagalog theatre. It turned out, however, to be a

Oct 10, 2017

Artist Speak! with Tony Mabesa

Artist Speak! with Tony Mabesa

Introducing ARTIST SPEAK! Artist Speak! is a series of interviews featuring theatre artists in the Philippines. Artists talk about their beginnings and life in the theatre, theatre practice in the Philippines, and their

Sep 21, 2017

The Sinulog: An Ilonggo Wedding Ritual

The Sinulog: An Ilonggo Wedding Ritual

The Sinulog is a traditional wedding ritual performed in several municipalities in Iloilo. It is a fight dance, where the objective of the group of warriors is to prevent the wedding party from

Sep 4, 2017

Martial Law Musicals: Theatre of a New War?

Martial Law Musicals: Theatre of a New War?

“Philippine theater has, through three eras of political struggle—Filipino-American, Japanese, anti-Marcos—never hesitated to go to war.” - Doreen G. Fernandez, “Seditious and Subversive: Theater of War” From the essay cited above